About your Search

20120901
20120930
STATION
CSPAN 9
CSPAN2 4
KQED (PBS) 2
KRCB (PBS) 2
CNN 1
CNNW 1
KQEH (PBS) 1
MSNBC 1
MSNBCW 1
WETA 1
WMPT (PBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 25
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
are not going to t along with anyone, so why try to pacify them? england, the united states, get out of the united nations. i'm tired of hearing hate speeches from people from other countries condemning us. this is a united nations of hate. host: if you go to the united nations web site, it says -- what you think? caller: i think at the time it was probably a good thing, but i don't think they counted on the rise of communism from china and russia and on the muslims and i think the muslims are a big problem with the united nations right now and we should stop trying to pacify them. we have a wenow who seems to sit there and watched-- we have a president now who seems to sit there and watch it. all he has been doing is apologizing. they killed two of our soldiers in afghanistan and the apologized to them. when the embassy was attacked, it was the man who had the movie's iffault. these people hate us. host: here is this on twitter -- here's the washington post front page -- many remember last year when the palestinian leader's request for membership was denied, not something supported
are furious with the united states -- if you talk to the pakistanis, we want the opportunity, and we want that kind of social link. it would help to build ties with the united states, and put a lot more of our concentration into society where the face of society is the face of your neighbor, the engineer who works in a ditch, the face of a student, the face of your child who has come to america, etc.. our focus on what pakistan is. i am not sure that is going to be possible in the next two years, and this is my second point. i will get back to the international element in a minute. i think that it is right for us to make sure that we focus on the issue of the counterinsurgency issues that we have. we have to deal with that correctly. we have to deal with al qaeda. we have to do with international terrorism. until 2014, it is unlikely in my mind that we can have a major change. that does not mean we cannot do our hallmark. it does not mean we cannot get, for example, the dynamic, philanthropic sector of pakistan to work with the thorough -- very dynamic philanthropic sector in the states,
interest and what can the united states do around what can it afford to do to defend that national interest? >> well, if you're not superpower.e not a i have one and 1/8. one is we have to have the money to pay for defense. we've got to manufacture here, believe it or not folks, you can't ship it all overseas, you have to make it here. you can't convert from potato chips to emergency. we've got to make things here. you just can't ship them overseas more. i hope we talk more about that. the second thing, on prhave to help russia succeed in the revolution and all the republics. when we talk about russia, we're thinking about many countries. that's pennies on the dollar. third, we've got all kind of agreements on paper and some being executed on getting rid of nuclear war heads. russia and the republics are t of control at best than what we control right now. it's an unstable situation. you have every counselry -- country over there trying to buy weapons. we really need to nail down the intercontinental bow listick missles. the ones that can hit us from russia. we're focused there.we made. we
in the united states senate where i've worked with many republicans to do important things like cutting spending, putting a cap on federal spending, like banning earmarks, like cutting taxes, over a trillion dollars for small businesses and working families. cleaning up war contracting and protecting and promoting american jobs. todd has worked closely with michele bachmann, and together them and a few others have really pushed things that would really harm missouri families. on march 8th of 2011, todd akin said i don't like social security, i think it's a bad investment. he's gone on in this campaign to delineate what is the triple whammy to social security. not only does he not like it, he would privatize it, put it on the roller coaster of wall street. he would raise the retirement age, and he would lower the benefit. on august 18th of 2011, he said medicare was unconstitutional. and since that time he has, in fact, voted several times to voucherrize medicare, to turn seniors over to private insurance companies, to arm wrestle with them for coverage and whether their claims will be paid and m
or iran or turkey invoking the greatness of their own power and impact and the united states tends to be more future oriented but in this particular case you found that the trauma of the hostage crisis and in the iranian revolution is still very formative and the - of americans who are responsible for the iran policy. >> guest: it is. ambassador ryan crocker told me one time in an interview that they are the most historical were the least historical society. and in this case i think there's still certainly every time they have a negotiation including the most recent one in moscow during the whole litany of grievances, so it is always on their mind. whether the u.s. policy makers realize it or not, the are too. the first years after the revolution clearly the hostage issue was for most american policy makers mind. if the iran contra happens that causes the relationship with the next prior risk and we saw it happen to ronald reagan and over a series of instances where they have spurred u.s. efforts to the rapprochement. there's a great example like to give just on this idea of the mo
willing, to the united states congress. [cheers and applause] my family's story isn't special. but special is the america that makes our story possible. ours is a nation like no other, a place for great journeys to be made in a single generation no matter who you are or where you come from the path is always forward. america didn't become the land of opportunity by accident. my grandmother's generation and generations before always saw beyond the horizons of their own lives and their own circumstances. they believed that opportunity created today would lead to prosperity tomorrow. that's the country they envisioned and that's the country they helped build. the roads and bridges they built, the schools and universities they created, the rights they fought for and won. these opened the doors to a decent job, a secure retirement, the chance for your children to do better than you did. and that's the middle class, the engine of our economic growth. with hard work, everybody ought to be able to get there and with hard work everybody ought to be able to stay there. and go beyond. the dream of ra
transformation of women writers or literary seekers from the rest of the world. as you know, united states of america, the land i love, the land i have adopted as my home, in recent decades has paid less and less attention to transiti transition, especially to literary translation. the number of books from the middle east and north africa into english -- [inaudible] in the last 32 years, there has been a lot more translation of english literature that there has been in america, from the land that many consider -- >> is there a contemporary woman rider and iran that you would recommend? olutely. let's first say that -- [inaudible] there is a renaissance. there is a renaissance going on in iran. and women are at center stage. let me give you one example about women novelists. in 1947, we have the first major collection of short stories by our foremost woman novelist can and she passed with a couple weeks ago at the age of 19. so women writers are very exceptional. women poets in iran go back over 1000 years, because poetry is more woman kind of art form. you can ride in the privacy of your h
to host this debate. my name a jonathan dine and i'm a libertarian candidate for the united states senate. like many of you, i'm tired of the constant fighting of the republicans and democrats. beating the other team has become more important. america is now on the verge of a financial collapse and both parties are to blame with their wreckless tax, borrow and spend policies. neither party seriously about balancing the budget or lowering your taxes or restoring your personal freedom. for as long as i can remember, republican and democrat politicians offering up solutions. higher and higher taxes. enough is enough. as a libertarian senator, i will stand up for your personal freedom, i'm socially accepting and tolerance. i'm also fiscalally responsible. i'm tired of the wreckless spending and the wreckless earmarks as your senator, i will vote no to wreckless spending, vote no to any legislation where spending exceeds revenue. i will advocate on the part of the balanced budget amendment. the government should live within its means just like the people of missouri. supporting my candidacy m
or five members of the united states congress that voted to eliminate the child nutrition program. the vote was something like 416- 5. i do not think that is the mainstream compromise, willing to fix problems attitude that we need to send to washington. all that will do is contribute to more gridlock. it is not what he said that was the problem, it is what he believes. like many of you, i found the comments insulting to the victims of rape, insinuating their crime was not in some sense legitimate. i believe it shows career politicians have grown to secluded in washington and has forgotten what life is like outside of politics. i was astonished to find he sits on the science committee, yet failed to understand is the eighth grade biology. what i think it does is illustrates the point that we have 530 by people who were to regulate everything, but produce nothing. we really need to step back and understand his views should not be regulated by the government. he speaks for smaller government, yet he wants to push government morality on other individuals because they choose a differen
candidates for president of the united states, sponsored by the commission on presidential debates. the candidates are: independent candidate ross perot, governor bill clinton, the democratic nominee, and president george bush, the republican nominee. i am jim lehrer of the macneil- lehrer news hour on pbs, and i will be the moderator for this 90-minute event, which is taking place before an audience in the athletic complex on the campus of washington university in st. louis, missouri. three journalists will be asking questions tonight. they are john mashek of the boston globe, ann compton of abc news, and sander vanocur, a freelance journalist. we will follow a format agreed to by representatives of the clinton and bush campaigns. that agreement contains no restrictions on the content or subject matter of the questions. each candidate will have up to 2 minutes for a closing statement. the order of those, as well as the questioning, was determined by a drawing. the first question goes to mr. perot. he will have 2 minutes to answer, to be followed by rebuttals of one minute each fro
illegal even here in the united states. in other words, the president of pakistan, one of our supposed allies, is calling for the united nations to enact international law that would trump the u.s. constitution. jon? jon: what a world. jonathan hunt, thanks. arthel: the road to victory in 2012 winding through ohio and the push for votes in this key swing state is kicking into high gear. president obama campaigning in ohio today less than a week before early voting gets underway. he'll be holding campus rallies at bowling green state university and kent state this afternoon hoping to drum up support among young voters. the republican campaign is crisscrossing the state on a three-day bus tour. governor romney today blasting the president's foreign policy and his handling of the economy. >> with incomes going down, every year going down, down, down, and prices of electricity up and health insurance up and the cost of gasoline having doubled, these are tough times even for families with jobs. i know what it takes to get this economy going again. i care about the people of america, and the
problems that we have here in the united states. >> ifill: is there also a problem with coming to some sort of resolution as far as germany and other bank-- money-- money givers go? that somebody else is going to get in line. that if you give greece money, spain is going to be standing there. if you give spain money portugal could be standing there. >> there is this problem of political moral hazard going on which is really, as you say, well, if you give us, let's say, debt relief to greece, well, then you can be pretty sure that other european countries that also have received bailouts will want the same treatment. so what you're trying to do in europe, in minute, is really to-- i believe that ultimately debt relief will have-- further debt relief will have to be given to greece by the euro area governments. but they're really trying to make the road to that so arduous and so terrible that nobody else in europe will really want to go down that route. and as we're looking at greece today-- which has a cumulative decline in g.d.p. of, you know, close to 20% and still dropping-- i think it's
by how scared the president of the united states looked, how disoriented he looked, how it seemed like they did not know where they were going. and i just want to do a hat tip right here, which, again, in this environment you probably aren't supposed to do. you know what? while george bush looked scared and disoriented that day, that day only, rudy giuliani stepped up. and he became america's mayor on that day. and he kept people advised of what was going on and was a great leader for that time. >> it was one of the great acts of spiritual and popular leadership that we'll ever see. and, you know, mayor giuliani is a big churchillian. but he was reading and looking at in those days and weeks a book by john lucash called "five days of may" in may of 1940 between churchill and chamberlain and halifax. and it was a marvelous case of leadership of being there. >> well, and like churchill and we're not comparing him to churchill, but for that time, though, like churchill, part of it was leadership, part of it was a great act. telling people, and by the way, that's what kept the british peop
and bring it back to the united states of america. we need a big bridge near washington, missouri. we need more highways and missouri. we need dam projects on the missouri river. i disagree with that. >> the center mention something about your position on competitive contracts. did you want to respond? >> i believe competitive bidding is a good thing. what you have going in iraq is pretty interesting. you had people who were terrorists. anything anybody did, they would load up or shoot anybody associated with it. -- they would blow it up or shoot anybody associated with it. the attacks on the idea of roads in afghanistan, the big economy and afghanistan is heroin. her win, you can put on a motorcycle -- heroin, you can put on a motorcycle and take somewhere. i have a kid serving in afghanistan. i he a kid almost killed in iraq. i understand the cost of what we are doing. i want to do it in the right way. >> did you want an additional 45 seconds? >>here was nothing about the contract and in iraq that did that require a competitive luck. there was nothing about that contracting. they finally
citizens of the united states. he credited churchill with influencing his ideas on foreign policy and the way he talked with the russian counter parts in years to come. then, a few years later, he see the influence of church hill's words and example on ronald reagan and margaret thatcher and the way they mute the special relationship forward. even gorbachev acknowledged the role of the speech in finding a way forward without resulting to directive war. what can it teach us here in the room? the soviet union is in war? in this age we have turned cynical toward the politician. we too often dismiss a speaker on either side as pulling something over on one of us. somebody who has a lot of say but not a lot to do. but i think the right speech, delivered by the right speaker, at the right time has the power with bringing the nation in to a being. as with the decoration of independents. he has the power to -- he warned hit hitler we shall never surrender. it has the power to aspire our enemies to change. ronald region speaking in berlin to tear down the wall to gorbachev, the berlin wall
of the united states. and i'm not that patient. >> the first lady went on to say her husband was the perfect temperament to be president. no emotional shifts, very steady. she says she's one of the only people who can really make him mad. >> i'd be in such big trouble. i'm not sure he can get away with that. >> he just did. >> she agreed with him. >> i do not know what happened in the limo on the way home. that's a private moment. >>> the replacement refs, another controversy. russell wilson throws a hail mary pass. it appears to be intercepted by green bay safety m.d. jennings. the replacement officials call it a touchdown. seahawks win, 14-12. >> i want to go back to michelle obama. i think there are a lot of people who think she would be a great president. >> the right answer when someone asks you if your wife would make a great president is yes. there's only one answer to that question. >> she was smooth with her answer about him about how he's patient. although some of his critics say he's been too patient with some in congress. >> the temperament. >> i wonder how that's going for them
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)